Who Needs Them?

Funerals are a sad but inevitable part of our lives.

Almost all races and religions be they Christian or Pagan have a ritual which farewells the dead in some way or another.

A funeral goes by many names but the desired result is for the proper disposal of the deceased in a way which offers closure for those left behind.

The thousands of different ceremonies associated with a funeral attests to the fact that we as human beings need to know that our loved ones who have passed on have been laid to rest in a manor which is befitting of our religion or our beliefs.

Even the most ardent atheist would not consider disposing of their loved one’s body in anything but a respectful and acceptable way.

Experts have explained the “funeral” ritual as more self appeasing rather than selfless. This makes sense because the deceased is hardly going to complain, they are after all dead.

When we look at the history of funerals we find that they have existed in one form or another since the day we stopped living in the trees. Archaeologists have made astounding discoveries of ritual burials dating back to the cave men.

I suppose we have the ancient Egyptians to thank for the pomp and ceremony with which they sent off their famous dead but let’s not forget the blazing Viking boats which were both crematorium and transport to Valhalla.

I guess for some the wake is the most important part of the ritual and again that part of the tradition is steeped in history.

For my part I’d like all my family and friends to gather around, have a drink to my passing, cremate me and scatter my ashes at sea.

Original? No, but I like it and who wants to spend eternity in some cold dark coffin.

When I die, find me at